4Humanities Event at CSUN

4Humanities

Date: May 16, 2014
Time: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Location: The Linda Nichols Joseph Room of Jerome Richfield Hall (JR 319), California State University, Northridge (Map)
Contact: Scott Kleinman (scott.kleinman@csun.edu)

4Humanities is a group of digital humanists who seek to assist in advocacy for the humanities by harnessing the skills and resources of the digital humanities community. On May 16, the local Southland 4Humanities chapters will meet at California State University, Northridge to work on the WhatEvery1Says Research Project (#WhatEvery1Says).

WhatEvery1Says emerges from the local chapter of 4Humanities at UC Santa Barbara (4Humanities@UCSB) to identify public perceptions of the humanities, formulate the core value(s) of the humanities, and strategize ways to “frame” these values for effective communication (through framing narratives, metaphors, scenarios, paradigms). The project’s purpose is to canvass and analyze public and academic discourse about the humanities in order to help advocates develop a coherent message about why the humanities matter to people and society. The project will conduct systematic, strategic research on perceptions of the humanities, on what academics and others believe the core values of the humanities to be, and on the way people “frame” narratives about the humanities. Data will be gathered through text mining and analyzed through forms of computational analysis such as topic modeling. Further information is available on the Project Overview Site.

Anyone who would like to become involved with 4Humanities or WhatEvery1Says is welcome to join us. Although the primary goal of the meeting will be planning and strategizing for WhatEvery1Says, there will be a time slot for people to talk give short presentations on whatever DH topics they would like. Lightning talks to longer demos will both be considered, and the timetable below will be adjusted accordingly.

The following is a preliminary schedule which is likely to undergo some change before the date of the meeting.

10:00-12:00

  • Introductions
  • Background on the Project
  • Discussion of opportunities for grant funding to support WhatEvery1Says and/or other 4Humanities activities.
  • Creating some timelines for some smaller 4Humanities projects or discussion of structures for collaboration.

12:00-1:00: Lunch

1:00-4:00

  • Introductions of afternoon attendees and morning re-cap.
  • Preparatory work and training for topic modelling.
  • Collective or small group run-through on a small corpus.

4:00-5:00

  • A time slot for spill-over from the previous session and for people to talk about and/or demo their DH projects, either in the form of lightning talks or “extended” lightning talks.

Getting to and Parking at CSUN

Driving Directions can be found on the CSUN Visitor Parking Information website or from Google Maps. Please go to Parking Booth #2 on the corner of Prairie and Darby to purchase a daily parking permit ($6). The Parking Booth only accepts cash, but the parking lots have dispensers that accept credit cards. Please keep your receipt; you will be reimbursed afterwards.

Getting to JR 319

Walk down Prairie towards campus. Cross Etiwanda and walk to the right around Sierra Center. On the other side of Sierra Center there are stairs leading up to the third floor. These provide direct access to Jerome Richfield Hall right outside JR 319.

Wifi Access

Visitors from campuses with Eduroam may be able to access the internet using that service. Otherwise, you will be given a password upon arrival.

Serendip-o-matic (and other good news)

Serendip-o-maticAnnouncing the online search tool Serendip-o-matic. From July 28-August 3, DH SoCal member Scott Kleinman worked with a fabulous group digital humanists to produce this tool from scratch as part of the One Week | One Tool project.
Serendip-o-matic connects your sources to digital materials located in libraries, museums, and archives around the world. By first examining your research interests, and then identifying related content in locations such as the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), EuropeanaTrove Australia, and Flickr Commons, Serendip-o-matic’s serendipity engine helps you discover photographs, documents, maps and other primary sources.
Whether you begin with text from an article, a Wikipedia page, or a full Zotero collection, Serendip-o-matic’s special algorithm extracts key terms and returns a surprising reflection of your interests. Because the tool is designed mostly for inspiration, search results aren’t meant to be exhaustive, but rather suggestive, pointing you to materials you might not have discovered. At the very least, the magical input-output process helps you step back and look at your work from a new perspective.

In other good news, Scott Kleinman has received an NEH Scholarly Editions and Translations grant for the first step in the creation of an Archive of Early Middle English. The project, a collaboration with Dorothy Kim of Vassar College (but who received her PhD from UCLA) and staff members from several other colleges, will produce a digital archive of manuscripts written in (or at least containing some) English between about 1100 and 1350. The project is just getting off the ground, but more information can be found on the Archive of Early Middle English web site.

DH SoCal Research Slam

Location: California State University, Northridge
Date: May 4, 2013
Deadline: April 15, 2013
Storify of Event Twitter Stream

On May 4, 2013 we are holding our first research slam at California State University, Northridge. This one-day event will be designed to showcase Digital Humanities work being done in California and to create opportunities for interaction between digital humanists from around the region.

The Research Slam will take place in the Lakeview Terrace Room of the University Student Union at California State University, Northridge (CSUN).

Parking is available in lots G4 or G3 off of Zelzah Ave. Daily parking permits may be purchased from the information kiosk on Zelzah or from dispensers located in lot G3. We are working to obtain parking permits for speakers, and more information on this—along with other logistics—will become available shortly. Here is the schedule:

10:00-10:20 Introduction
10:20-10:40 Guided Resource Inquiries: Integrating Archives into Learning and Information Literacy Objectives using Document-Based Questions
Steve Kutay & Ellen Jarosz (CSUN)
10:40-11:00 A Database of Ancient Magic
Jacob Ferrari, Belen Gutierrez, and Miriam Posner (UCLA)
11:00-11:20 Social Media Selves: A Comparison of Interaction Patterns & Emotional Displays on Tumblr and Facebook
Jacob Ferrari & Iman Salehian (UCLA)
11:20-11:40 Exploring the Use of Digital Tools in the Study of Hip-Hop Lyrical Expression
Anthony Ratcliff (CSUN)
11:40-12:00 Affective Networks in Ensemble Character Dramas: Learning from Fans
Alston D’Silva (UC Santa Barbara)
12:00-1:00 Lunch
1:00-2:00 Teaching Digital Humanities
Jana Remy (Chapman University), Liz Losh (UC San Diego), Miriam Posner (UCLA), Jacqueline Wernimont (Scripps College)
2:00-3:00 Poster Presentations

Chapman ePortfolios for Promotion & Tenure
Jana Remy (Chapman University)

Lexomics for Text Analysis
Scott Kleinman (CSUN)

Now What? Text Mining Patient Pain Narratives
Adam Swenson (CSUN)

4Humanities Minidocs
Kristin Cornelius and Melissa Filbeck (CSUN)

Digital Service Learning: Connecting Jane Austen Studies and Civic Engagement Online
Stephanie Harper and Danielle Spratt (CSUN)

Making a Face: Gender, Race, and Avatar Technologies
Amanda Phillips (UC Santa Barbara)

3:00-4:00 Breakout Sessions
Poster sessions will segue into breakout sessions for those who wish to discuss opportunities for collaboration, engage in hacking, or drink a lot of coffee.