DH SoCal Research Slam

Location: California State University, Northridge
Date: May 4, 2013
Deadline: April 15, 2013
Storify of Event Twitter Stream

On May 4, 2013 we are holding our first research slam at California State University, Northridge. This one-day event will be designed to showcase Digital Humanities work being done in California and to create opportunities for interaction between digital humanists from around the region.

The Research Slam will take place in the Lakeview Terrace Room of the University Student Union at California State University, Northridge (CSUN).

Parking is available in lots G4 or G3 off of Zelzah Ave. Daily parking permits may be purchased from the information kiosk on Zelzah or from dispensers located in lot G3. We are working to obtain parking permits for speakers, and more information on this—along with other logistics—will become available shortly. Here is the schedule:

10:00-10:20 Introduction
10:20-10:40 Guided Resource Inquiries: Integrating Archives into Learning and Information Literacy Objectives using Document-Based Questions
Steve Kutay & Ellen Jarosz (CSUN)
10:40-11:00 A Database of Ancient Magic
Jacob Ferrari, Belen Gutierrez, and Miriam Posner (UCLA)
11:00-11:20 Social Media Selves: A Comparison of Interaction Patterns & Emotional Displays on Tumblr and Facebook
Jacob Ferrari & Iman Salehian (UCLA)
11:20-11:40 Exploring the Use of Digital Tools in the Study of Hip-Hop Lyrical Expression
Anthony Ratcliff (CSUN)
11:40-12:00 Affective Networks in Ensemble Character Dramas: Learning from Fans
Alston D’Silva (UC Santa Barbara)
12:00-1:00 Lunch
1:00-2:00 Teaching Digital Humanities
Jana Remy (Chapman University), Liz Losh (UC San Diego), Miriam Posner (UCLA), Jacqueline Wernimont (Scripps College)
2:00-3:00 Poster Presentations

Chapman ePortfolios for Promotion & Tenure
Jana Remy (Chapman University)

Lexomics for Text Analysis
Scott Kleinman (CSUN)

Now What? Text Mining Patient Pain Narratives
Adam Swenson (CSUN)

4Humanities Minidocs
Kristin Cornelius and Melissa Filbeck (CSUN)

Digital Service Learning: Connecting Jane Austen Studies and Civic Engagement Online
Stephanie Harper and Danielle Spratt (CSUN)

Making a Face: Gender, Race, and Avatar Technologies
Amanda Phillips (UC Santa Barbara)

3:00-4:00 Breakout Sessions
Poster sessions will segue into breakout sessions for those who wish to discuss opportunities for collaboration, engage in hacking, or drink a lot of coffee.

UCSB Literature.Culture.Media Center Third Annual Research Slam

http://lcm.english.ucsb.edu/?p=558

The Literature.Culture.Media Center proudly presents the schedule for our Third Annual Research Slam, taking place on Friday, May 21. We are fortunate to have a group that spans disciplines from Computer Science to Women’s Studies to History and an historical range from the early modern to the present day. Please join us for a hyperactive afternoon of interdisciplinarity and temporal disruption to celebrate the myriad ways that humanities research can meet with technological disciplines.

UCSB’s Literature.Culture.Media Center is devoted to investigating and highlighting innovative ways of combining traditional humanities research with concepts and methodologies related to information media and technology. The goal of the Research Slam is to combine the best features of traditional academic humanities venues like lectures and roundtables and combine them with the free-flowing, hyperattentive and participatory focus of the poster session and poetry slam. The format includes a series of parallel presentations, followed by a plenary discussion at the end of the afternoon. Glow necklaces will be provided!

3rd Annual Research Slam

Opening Remarks: 12:50 (South Hall 2635)

Session 1: 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm (SH 2635)

Salman Bakht (Media Arts and Technology) – Nodes and Passages
Anne Cong-Huyen (English) – The Transnational Geo-Social Configurations of Catfish and Mandala
Zach Horton (English)/Lindsay Thomas (English) – Academic Media Production as Generative Circuit: The Collaborative Media Commons
Jana Remy (UCI History) – Scholars and the Social Web
Amanda Phillips (English) – The Potentials of Network Mapping for Hypertext Studies

Session 2: 2:10 – 3:10 (Early Modern Center – SH 2510)

Roberta Gilman (Linguistics, History) – In Place, Out of Place: “Bordertown” Hip Hop
Zach Horton (English)/Alison Reed (English) – Language as Pure Affect: Emoticon Shakespeare
Penny Richards (UCLA Center for the Study of Women) – Letters from Sanquhar/The Mordecai Female Academy: Transcribing Women’s History Through Blogging
Liberty Stanavage (English) – Speaking Revenge: Analyzing Revengers’ Rhetoric Through Language Visualization

Session 3: 3:20 – 4:20 (Literature.Culture.Media Center – SH 2509)

Harrison Desantis (English)/Jonathan Svilar (English, Philosophy) – Monster Mashup
Laura Devendorf (Computer Science) – Association Constellations
Pehr Hovey (Media Arts and Technology) – Tweet Delete: Visualizing Erasure Online
Amanda Phillips (English) – On the Download: The Sexual Economies of Second Life
Dana Solomon (English) – Twitter Urban Sensorium Project

Closing Remarks/Plenary Session 4:30 – 5:30 (South Hall 2635)

Reception to follow.

Literature.Culture.Media Research Slam – EXTENDED

This call went out a couple months ago to the UCSB campus, but I’d like to extend the invitation to any DH SoCal scholars that wish to participate!

Call for Submissions

Literature.Culture.Media Center Research Slam
Down from the lectern and into the crowd!

Friday, May 21
1 pm – 530 pm

University of California, Santa Barbara

Department of English
South Hall (various locations)

Please send project description, technical requirements (if any), and a short biography by May 9 to researchslam@gmail.com.

Have you done recent work that you’re particularly proud of? Are you working on a project and would like to get feedback from your peers and faculty? Interested in seeing the diversity of scholarship occurring on campus? UCSB’s Literature.Culture.Media Center is devoted to investigating and highlighting innovative ways of combining traditional humanities research with concepts and methodologies related to information media and technology. In this tradition, we are hosting the third annual Research Slam to showcase the unique work done by scholars across campus.

The goal of the Research Slam is to combine the best features of traditional academic humanities venues like lectures and roundtables and combine them with the free-flowing, hyperattentive and participatory focus of the poster session and poetry slam. The format includes a series of parallel presentations, followed by a plenary discussion at the end of the afternoon. Glow necklaces will be provided!

A Research Slam is:

• Non-linear intellectual encounters
• Smaller, more personalized discussions, followed by a large group session
• Multi-media, multi-modal, and/or multi-temporal
• Inclusive of faculty and students
• Performative, interactive, playful
• Interested in new paradigms of sharing scholarly work

A Research Slam is not:

• Divided and structured hierarchically
• Quiet or stationary
• Lecture-based
• Traditional or conventional
• Boring

The Literature.Culture.Media Center is now soliciting multimedia projects, research posters, and other creative or scholarly works taking advantage of the intersections between academics, information and technology to showcase at the Slam, regardless of department, class level, or period of focus of the contributor. We invite faculty, graduate students, or undergraduates to apply! If you think your project fits the structure of the event, we’d love to have you!

Potential Critical Nodes:

archives
history
reading/audience practices
educational technology
media arts
popular culture
activism
GIS/mapping/locative media
communication studies

(Please note that the Research Slam does not endorse exhaustive lists. Please expand at your will.)